Installation Views

This is an installation view of the exhibition by artist Sarah Jones in 1999 at Anton Kern Gallery, New York.This is an installation view of the exhibition by artist Sarah Jones in 1999 at Anton Kern Gallery, New York.This is an installation view of the exhibition by artist Sarah Jones in 1999 at Anton Kern Gallery, New York.This is an installation view of the exhibition by artist Sarah Jones in 1999 at Anton Kern Gallery, New York.

Works

This is a photograph titled The May Tree (Francis Place) (I) by artist Sarah Jones made in 1999. This is a C print mounted on aluminum, and the dimensions are 59 inches by 59 inches.This is a photograph titled The Sitting Room (Francis Place) (IV) by artist Sarah Jones made in 1999. This is a C print mounted on aluminum, and the dimensions are 59 inches by 59 inches.This is a sculpture titled The Shed (Francis Place) (I) by artist Sarah Jones made in 1999. The materials are C Print print mounted on aluminum, and the dimensions are 59 inches by 59 inches.This is a sculpture titled The Spare Room (Francis Place) (V) by artist Sarah Jones made in 1999. The materials are C Print print mounted on aluminum, and the dimensions are 59 inches by 59 inches.This is a photograph titled The Landing (Francis Place) (I) by artist Sarah Jones made in 1998. This is a C print mounted on aluminum, and the dimensions are 59 inches by 59 inches.This is a sculpture titled The Fence (I) by artist Sarah Jones made in 1998. The materials are C Print print mounted on aluminum, and the dimensions are 59 inches by 59 inches.

Press Release

Sarah Jones
November 4 –
December 4, 1999

Opening on November 3rd, Anton Kern Gallery will present an exhibition by British artist Sarah Jones. This is the artist's first solo show in New York.

 

The photographs of Sarah Jones appear to depict a luminous world of formal ritual and visual beauty. By working with three girls over a number of years and moving through the theatre offered by the respective interiors and gardens of two houses the artist brings to this world a serialized novelistic dimension made out of encounters that are at once real and precisely imagined. These large format photographs, mounted on aluminum and unframed, present the order of the protective enclosure and the potential for its not so comfortable transformation.

 

The emphasis on rooms and the static relationship between the figures and objects that inhabit them are reminiscent of Dutch and Flemish genre paintings of the 16th and 17th centuries. Solitary girls or girls in groups of two or three linger in ominous gardens, wait in formal dining rooms, or haunt the bedrooms and hallways of these houses. Obscure histories and the memory of past events inform these representations and lend a portentous aspect to narratives that extend beyond the limits of the frame.

 

The highly staged and artificial appearance of the scenes, the stylized ritual of gesture and detail, distances the viewer from any absorbing dramatic experience of the image. Each view instead presents itself as a frozen scene, an episode among myriads, suggestive of change and mysteriously poised between collusion and collision.

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