Installation Views

This is an installation view of the exhibition titled “Solid As A Rock” featuring works by Bendix Harms in 2006 at Anton Kern Gallery.This is an installation view of the exhibition titled “Solid As A Rock” featuring works by Bendix Harms in 2006 at Anton Kern Gallery.This is an installation view of the exhibition titled “Solid As A Rock” featuring works by Bendix Harms in 2006 at Anton Kern Gallery.This is an installation view of the exhibition titled “Solid As A Rock” featuring works by Bendix Harms in 2006 at Anton Kern Gallery.This is an installation view of the exhibition titled “Solid As A Rock” featuring works by Bendix Harms in 2006 at Anton Kern Gallery.

Works

This is a painting titled Boeingbandiger by artist Bendix Harms made in 2005. The materials are oil on linen, and the dimensions are 78.75 inches by 98.5 inches.This is a painting titled Vakuumsein by artist Bendix Harms made in 2005. The materials are oil on linen, and the dimensions are 55.12 inches by 82.68 inches.This is a work on paper titled Spatzenhirn by artist Bendix Harms made in 2005. The materials are oil on linen, and the dimensions are 78.75 inches by 98.5 inches.

Press Release

Bendix Harms

Solid As A Rock

January 19 –
February 25, 2006

For his first solo show in New York, German artist Bendix Harms has created a high-spirited body of large-scale paintings, full of enjoyment, anticipation, and melancholy, which will be exhibited at Anton Kern Gallery from January 19 through February 25, 2006.

 

Straightforwardly enough, the show is centered around a painting of a bearded man’s face—sensual lips, eyes of gentle sadness—with the show’s title “Solid As A Rock” inscribed on his fluffy white beard. The painting does, in fact, set up all motifs, moods and important life-questions of Harms’ work: love, grief, yearning, and a pointed zest for life. The brushstroke is loose and coarse, the oil paint applied in broad, swift movements, the palette reduced to blues and blacks accentuated with white over-paint. Words are integrated into the composition—all with a decisive disinterest in verisimilitude in favor of spirited emotional communication.

 

Bendix fittingly comments on his mode of painting stating, “[…] I love artists’ late works—when they display a completely free style because it no longer matters whether their work will earn them applause or a rap over the knuckles. They’re beyond all concepts. And I love artists who anticipate their late work.”

 

Harms’s paintings depict moments of emotional attention, a man mourning over a dead bird, two owls cuddling in the night sky, a man and his dog gazing at an aircraft that flies into the setting sun. With heartfelt care and thought, Harms creates a provocatively trusting view of the world and of human nature.

 

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